Music Healing: Tuvan Music

Hello World and Namaste sweet people.
This is the first part of a series I am doing about “spiritual music”, which is a very broad genre but if you lend me your ears I hope to unlock some doors in your heart … I ensure it is a great journey.

Let me start by saying that I believe in music and in its use to influence change.

Music is my lover.

I was brought up in India in an “unconventional” family. My father is from Israel and he is an Ethnomusicologist and my mother was a beautiful Ukranian dancer. They met in London at university. Their passions drove them to India in the mid 1980’s. They fell in love with the people and the culture, and also it was there that they were blessed with the joy of having me : )
We lived in a town near Kolkata, in a small and cosy house with a big and beautiful garden. I remember that my house was always filled with music, many different types of music. I also remember my parents used to invite musicians to play at home in pseudo bohemian – pseudo academic gatherings with music as their main guest. My father taught me everything I know about the magic of sound and the power it has to heal. But well, enough of my story, I’ll have more time and space to tell you about me. Let’s dive deep into one of the most fulfilling human expressions I have listened; the Tuvan Singing.

The Tuva Republic is a territory located in the steppes and mountains of south Siberia, a vast chunk of wild land that once was ruled by the fierce Mongols.


The Tyvan people have two main religions: Tibetan Buddhism and Shamanism. Shamanist Tyvans practice the Tengrism who believe in totems, spirits and natural phenomena.  These people still pray to deities such as “Munkh Khukh Tengri” which literally means “Eternal Blue Sky”.

Now we can imagine a bit better how this part of the world looks and sounds. Tyvans have chants. Their music main component is vocals. Tuvan singers have a huge range of tones. Their singing method is “famous” because is able to create two or three different modal tones at the same time as well they can imitate animal sounds. It was common to play this music in nature like in caves or river banks. The musicians gave long breaks in between songs to let nature talk back to them.

I beg you to use your imagination and picture a nomads life in between mountains, forests, blue skies and rivers. Waking up inside your yurt and taking a peek outside to that vast and majestic landscape that surrounds you. So close your eyes, relax and float downstream…

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